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Janie and Barrie Herr
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Central Tucson

 
Central Tucson includes the University of Arizona, Downtown, and many of Tucson's historic neighborhoods. This area is also where Tucson's performing arts theaters are located including the U of A's Centennial Hall, the Tucson Convention Center and The Temple of Music and Art.

Downtown Tucson is an eclectic area made up of government buildings, the Tucson Museum of Art, the Main Library and many local businesses. 4th Ave. is a university area street with many local shops, restaurants and nightlife. 4th Ave hosts a street fair twice a year.

   Central Tucson Area Links



Search Central Tucson Real Estate by Price


 
Search Central Tucson Real Estate by Neighborhood





Armory Park

Delightfully decorated with ornamental street lamps, perky lawns, and billowing street trees, Armory Park
is one of Tucson´s oldest and most
distinguished neighborhoods, bounded by 12th Street on the north, Stone Avenue on the west, 19th Street on the south, and Second Avenue on the east.

Celebrated as one of Tucson´s first historic districts, Armory Park is visual display of nostalgia and charm. Situated on a 30-acre block southeast of the city´s business district, this aged neighborhood offers a glimpse into the design and interests of Tucson´s early residents. Adorned with Victorian and Mission style homes, mature street trees, ornamental lamps, and spacious lawns, Armory Park´s aesthetic decor contrasts nicely with its many public uses. Home to the Tucson Children´s Museum, the former Carnegie Library, the recently renovated Temple of Music & Art, and the adjacent Senior Center, these cultural attractions are only a hint to the architectural uniqueness of this downtown area.


 

 

 



Barrio Historico

Representing the area´s rich cultural identity, Barrio Historico is a place where familial bonds have formed and sustained the unity of Tucson´s early minority neighborhoods.

Where Anglo, Mexican, and native cultures intertwine, you\'ll find the soul of Barrio Historico. Defined as a ward, quarter, or suburb, the Spanish word "barrio" signifies more than a physical locale... It´s a cultural and architectural heritage distinct in Tucson´s diverse ethnic communities.Located south of Tucson Community Center, Barrio Historico was once residence to working class Mexican families. Characterized by close-fitting Sonoran rowhouses and one-story adobe and brick dwellings, the snug living quarters were a tribute to the neighborhood´s communal unity. Hence, barrio laborers typically worked within the area in which they lived. Present day structural designs reflect the traditional character of Tucson´s early barrios, as many of the old adobe buildings have been restored, leaving the vicinity´s architectural charm intact. Encompassing four distinct neighborhoods: Elysian Grove, El Membrillo, Santa Rosa, and Barrio Viejo, Barrio Historico was declared a City District in 1978. It is bounded on the north by Cushing Street, on the west by the railroad tracks, on the south by 18th Street, and on the east by Stone Avenue.



 

 

 



El Encanto

In the center of town, amid the hustle and bustle of urban activity, lies a hidden neighborhood boasting some of Tucson´s most elegant homes. At times dubbed the "Beverly Hills of Tucson", El Encanto is the quintessential blend of sophistication and privacy.

Urbanized in the late 1920´s, this central charmer has a unique, if not mysterious design. Developed around an innermost hub, the streets broaden in a diagonal pattern, creating an atypical geometric shape, much like the spokes of a wheel. As expected, this motif complements the enigmatic character of this opulent central neighborhood.

Characterized by a strong California influence-lush landscaping, Royal Palm tree-lined streets, and shadowy walled courtyards, El Encanto boasts nearly 150 homes constructed in a variety of architectural styles. An eclectic mix of European flair--Spanish, Italian, Moroccan, Mexican, and early Californian, these 1-acre homes can easily exceed $1 million in price.


 

 

 



El Presidio

Distinguished by its unique historic setting, El Presidio is Tucson´s earliest neighborhood. Once home to ancient Indian tribes, Spanish militia, and early migrant settlers, eclectic homes now garnish the antique streets of the city´s first residential district. Named for the Spanish military garrison that once stood on this site, the neighborhood is bounded by Alameda Street on the south, Main Avenue on the west, Franklin Street on the north, and Church Avenue on the east, and is home to the Tucson Museum of Art.

El Presidio was the city\'s most affluent neighborhood in the 1880s. It has been refuge for Spanish officers, soldiers, and early southwestern settlers. Designated a historic district in 1975, this antique borough is tied both physically and culturally to Tucson´s indigenous communities. Reflecting earlier Spanish-Mexican architectural styles, as well as later Anglo designs, El Presidio is a celebration of Southern Arizona´s diverse building techniques. Here, Sonoran, Spanish, Colonial, Victorian, Tudor, and Bungalow are uniquely represented, including many of Tucson´s distinguished historic homes. Many large homes have been restored and now house restaurants and art galleries. Dwellings such as the Steinfeld Mansion, the Wright-Zelleweger house, and the Hereford House reveal past design influences that have uniquely fashioned our neighborhoods today.


 

 

 



Ft. Lowell Historic District

Preservation efforts by historians and anthropologists have unveiled a rich history of culture and custom;Much of which have shaped our communities today. Originally settled by ancient Indians, the Fort Lowell area wonderfully reflects Tucson´s historic, scenic, and natural resources.

First settled in 300 AD, the Fort Lowell Historic District reflects the uniqueness of Tucson´s varied communities. Located southwest of the convergence of the Tanque Verde and Pantano Washes, this early neighborhood comprises an area of 150 acres. Designated a historic district in 1976, the Fort Lowell borough is a testament to the rich ethnic heritage of Tucson´s indigenous people. Remains of the settlement reveal lodgings and artifacts of ancient Hohokam, late 19th century militia, Mexican settlers of El Fuerte, and Anglo families that arrived in the mid 1920´s. Today, aged adobe dwellings, the mission style San Pedro Chapel, and Fort Lowell Historic museum celebrate the cultural relics of Tucson´s past inhabitants.


 

 

 



Sam Hughes

An eclectic mix of old and new, this central university neighborhood boasts some of Tucson´s most unique and charming historic homes.

It\'s borders are Speedway to Broadway, and Campbell to Tucson Blvd. From Southwestern to Spanish Colonial, from Historic Adobe to Nouveau, the eclectic array of Sam Hughes architecture is as diverse as Tucson´s neighborhoods. Located across from the U of A, just east of Campbell, tree-lined streets, stunningly landscaped lawns, and historic homes make Sam Hughes one of the most coveted residences in the metropolitan Tucson area. (Not surprisingly, its wide, picturesque streets are a favorite avenue for evening strolls, as well as the local "track" for avid exercisers). Featuring a dramatic display of real estate prices, ranging from the low $100´s to the almost a million, the nearly 2000 homes comprising this central neighborhood are truly an aesthetic delight.


 

 

 



Winterhaven

A treat for old and young alike, this inviting central village delights holiday visitors with its dazzling array of festival ornaments. Everything´s in bloom and all is bright along these tree-lined streets.

Still, lush lawns and charming mid-century bungalows aren´t the only elements decorating this central neighborhood. One of Tucson´s oldest subdivision, Winterhaven is as festive as it is unique. Upholding a seasonal tradition, residents garnish the neighborhood in holiday themes, turning their homes and yards into beautiful, jovial displays. Welcoming sightseers of all ages, Winterhaven´s Festival of Lights is one the city´s most enjoyed holiday outings.